Daniel Cormier enlisted Steven Seagal to show him secret moves ahead of UFC 252

I wish I was kidding, I wish I was kidding, I wish I was kidding. I just realized I am apparently not dreaming and that I am typing this for real.

First…movie star, and I use that term loosely, Steven Seagal appeared to take Anderson Silva and Lyoto Machida under his wing. Granted, I think we all knew exactly what that was and I’ll just leave that there. Now he has been enlisted by former heavyweight champion Daniel Cormier to show him some secret moves ahead of his trilogy ending bout with Stipe Miocic this Saturday at UFC 252.

I find it hard to believe that someone like Daniel would try to incorporate moves from a sport that has never worked in mixed martial arts or any street fight that I’ve ever seen against someone decently trained. I will stress that I am not saying it is completely useless and I am sure it would work in some scenario somewhere. Moving on…

Watch this clip from Joe Rogan’s podcast where he discusses Seagal and aikido.

Listening to people try and defend the aikido martial art in an MMA discussion may be one of my favorite pastimes. Maybe I meant something to pass the time. You know what I mean.

Again, the thought of elite fighter Daniel Cormier actually integrating something from Steven Seagal into his game at this stage in his career seems like an inside joke that only Daniel is having a laugh at. Then again, the affection that his ESPN cohost Ariel Helwani has for the aging martial arts movie star could mean that DC is actually listening and possibly going to try and make it work. I hope not.

Here is the clip that has been circulating. Whether the clip is older than people are saying or it just happened one minute ago the point is that if I was going to challenge for the heavyweight championship and it was my last bout I would probably not call Steven to help me get ready for a killer like Stipe Miocic.

The truth is that it is probably nothing more than a photo opportunity type situation that’s going to get a little more main stream coverage and give talk shows something to debate and discuss for at least a half an hour.